Who’s Ted?

If you search your memory banks back to yesterday, I laid claim to the fact that I think I have a lot of general knowledge.

One thing about which I have almost zero knowledge is TED Talks.

I had never even heard of TED Talks until a colleague was mentioning it to me last year. He thought I was kidding when I said that I didn’t know what he was talking about.

wikipedia

wikipedia

I thought he was talking about that talking teddy bear from that movie that I never saw but heard it wasn’t a movie for kids. Shhhhh…….don’t tell him.

Talk about being clueless.  But I checked it out because I was embarrassed that I knew nothing about this wildly popular phenomenon.

Yuck.  I looked at a bunch of different ones on topics that interest me.  Utterly boring.  I found myself concentrating on the microphone/earbud thingy they were using.  Then I saw you could read the scripts.  So I did that.

But it isn’t like reading books or articles.  Everyone has different tastes, and mine don’t run to TED talks.  I feel guilty because as I researched, it was like, Barb, do you live under a rock?  How do you not know of this?ted-talks

 

Are you guys fans of TED talks?  If yes, and you can pinpoint why, I’m really interested to know.  I’m thinking the reason I don’t like them is my wildly short attention span.

Please let me know your opinion on TED talks.

 

About Barb Knowles

The things that are important to me are family, friends, teaching, writing, languages and using my sense of humor to navigate this crazy world. Please join me on this blogging adventure...
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43 Responses to Who’s Ted?

  1. Carrie Rubin says:

    I never watch them. Don’t have the time (or, like you, the interest). I tend to read topics I’m interested in or get audiobooks.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Barb Knowles says:

      I used to listen to audiobooks a lot in the car. When I was having my eye surgery and was afraid that it would bother me to read at first, I got Audible and started listening to a book but then fell asleep, lol. Reading doesn’t usually put me to sleep. This was a nonfiction book “Mossad” and the voice actor was really monotone.

      Like

      • Carrie Rubin says:

        That’ll do it. Zzzzz… I just listened to Trevor Noah’s book on Audible. Soooo good. It’s about his life growing up in South African, half white, half black. It’s called Born a Crime. I love him on The Daily Show, and since he’s so good at accents, I decided to listen to the book instead of read it. So glad I did. He’s a terrific narrator.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Barb Knowles says:

        *sigh* yet another thing to put on my list. I’ll have to quit my day job. I by-passed the list and bought it. I’ll let you know what I think.

        Like

      • Carrie Rubin says:

        Yay! You won’t be disappointed. Best audiobook I’ve ever listened to in terms of narrator and a great book as well. I’ve never seen a book on Goodreads have such a high average rating (not with that many reviews, anyway). Goodreads reviewers are notoriously tough. But they love this one. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • Barb Knowles says:

        My goal for Saturday is to organize my Goodreads account and figure out how to find other people’s lists. I’ll let you know when I’m up and running.

        Like

  2. Patsy Porco says:

    I think TED talks can be wonderful resource for those interested in a specific topic. I don’t go looking for them, but if someone recommended one to me, I’d check it out. If the presenter held my interest, I’d pay attention until the end (just like in college).

    Liked by 2 people

    • Barb Knowles says:

      Which is kind of funny, because I’m a teacher. But I wouldn’t want to listen to myself for 40 minutes either. All of my friends just fainted in disbelief that I said that. Maybe if they were shorter. I really think it’s my attention span.

      Liked by 2 people

  3. I’ve watched one TED talk. It was by Monica Lewinsky, about shame and social media. It was very interesting–I probably should revisit it, as I think it’s even more relevant now.

    That said, that was about two years ago, and I wasn’t so enthralled that I had a desire to watch more TED talks. So I can’t say I’m a huge fan–in general, I also prefer audiobooks.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. I love some of them and have posted a couple to my blogs when they add to the subject which I am writing about. That said I can see how some could be boring if the topic is not of particular interest to you 🗣😴😬

    Liked by 1 person

  5. annieg421 says:

    Never heard of Ted Talks!

    Liked by 1 person

  6. I’ve listened to a few and have not been impressed. Felt like shallow coverage of the subjects. Maybe I just demand deeper dives into the subjects I am interested in.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. bluestempond says:

    I’ve heard of them but have never watched/listened to a whole one. I prefer the snippet version I get on NPR.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Ann Coleman says:

    I first heard of them when they were mentioned in the book, “Where’d you go, Bernadette?” Since then, I watched one (or maybe an excerpt of one) that someone had posted on their blog, and it was actually rather good. That being said, I haven’t sought out any others…

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Almost Iowa says:

    I tried watching them but couldn’t. There is something about TED Talks that speaks to confirmation bias…ie, we will tell you what you want to hear. I prefer things that I have struggle with to admit they are right.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Bea dM says:

    They’re an excellent resource for adults in non English-speaking countries, who need to practise their English : for listening and to get them talking. I’ve been assigning them for years as “homework”: they can choose topics they’re interested in, and give summaries, both oral and written.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Paul says:

    Ted and I used to have some talks a couple of years ago. I cherry picked which ones I wanted to listen to, specifically ones that sounded interested and were no longer than 12 minutes. After a while, they all just started to sound the same. Someone presenting a problem and then resolving it within 10 minutes and encouraging everyone listening to do what they did. Too preachy.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. One reason I like TED is because they are short and too the point. Presenters have to prepare and generally stay within a 20 minute time slot. There are tons and tons of boring ones, but there are some nuggets out there too. Some have even been life changing for the presenters. I really like Brene Brown’s talks.

    Liked by 1 person

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